Aloisia Gray

A fun little cornucopia of Supernatural, Doctor Who, Sherlock, Music, Social justice, Beautiful imagery, and Vidyagamz.
Enjoy.

se-co-nd-me:

poppypicklesticks:

merp-senpai:

dizabell:

Anime Sharks are my favorite fucking thing in the world.

This is stupid.

don’t be such a tsundere 

lol

(Source: thehec, via grndr)

(Source: sandandglass, via nowyoukno)

missbassweight:

patternicity:

This is one of the saddest things I have ever seen.

Forever reblog. hate is taught, always.

(via grndr)

taranamgabata:

did u know, there’s this small rural town in japan called obama.
so there’s this girl in a 2007 drama who moved from the city to obama.
and she hates it at first and blames the town for her misery.
i kid u not. didn’t make this shit up.

(via grndr)

hatchworthsmoustache:

snowbouquet:

Only on the internet could you find a shark in a cat suit riding a roomba.

hatchworthsmoustache:

snowbouquet:

Only on the internet could you find a shark in a cat suit riding a roomba.

(via grndr)

darlingdormer:

Natalie Dormer for “Face Up” [x]

'Face Up' is part of [the charity Plan UK]'s global Because I Am A Girl campaign, which aims to champion girls' rights across the world. Through it, Plan hopes to ensure that all girls can live safe from violence, gain an education, marry who they wish and have their voices heard. The primary focus of the campaign is to end Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and prevent child marriage in a generation. Currently, more than 3.5 million girls are at risk from FGM across the globe, and a young girl is forced into marriage every two seconds.

darlingdormer:

Natalie Dormer for “Face Up” [x]

'Face Up' is part of [the charity Plan UK]'s global Because I Am A Girl campaign, which aims to champion girls' rights across the world. Through it, Plan hopes to ensure that all girls can live safe from violence, gain an education, marry who they wish and have their voices heard. The primary focus of the campaign is to end Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and prevent child marriage in a generation. Currently, more than 3.5 million girls are at risk from FGM across the globe, and a young girl is forced into marriage every two seconds.

(via grndr)

pinkmany:

pinkmany:

why was girl at school walking around with a goddamn starbucks cup wtf

and i’m not saying that bc “ughhhh girls and their starbucks”

but like

there are no starbucks in this country…. the closest one is 220 miles away

so…. did she come back from the one…

(via grndr)

whovian-all-over:

ohyousillypotato:

And here we can see the Blogger in her natural habitat.

image

The blogger is a shy, docile creature…

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… that prefers the darkness…

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… and tends to be wary of the outside world.

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The Blogger rarely sleeps, and when it does, it does so in seemingly random places.image

We have attempted to understand the dietary habits of the Blogger…

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… but to no avail.

image

I am so glad this is back

(Source: mechapuppy, via intensional)

squided:

lenkagamin-e:

squided:

It’s almost fall you know that means we will all be needing some

image

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image

image

dont bring this back

I waited an entire year to make this post.  It’s coming back.

(Source: squided, via grndr)

thecarvingwitch:

It’s about 20 degrees cooler in this shade

thecarvingwitch:

It’s about 20 degrees cooler in this shade

(Source: katara, via satanssecretblog)

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

(via satanssecretblog)

singwithme2397:

the horror and concentration on his face

(Source: thomasghally, via onlylolgifs)

scribbleowl:

sango-hentaitenshi:

necktie-nyxeth:

longleggedgit:


r-dart:


Now you know the truth of what’s going through my mind at parties.


oh my gosh the last panel actually made me tear up


gpoy

I can’t tell you how accurate this is

This is a really good depiction of social anxiety because it focuses on inner states rather then outward actions. As someone very good at concealing his anxiety, I appreciate it.

scribbleowl:

sango-hentaitenshi:

necktie-nyxeth:

longleggedgit:

r-dart:

Now you know the truth of what’s going through my mind at parties.

oh my gosh the last panel actually made me tear up

gpoy

I can’t tell you how accurate this is

This is a really good depiction of social anxiety because it focuses on inner states rather then outward actions. As someone very good at concealing his anxiety, I appreciate it.

(via satanssecretblog)